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Flooding services

King County, Washington

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Flooding services and information in King County, WA

Flood safety video in multiple languages

Flood waters know no boundaries -- physical or cultural. No matter what language you speak, if you live in King County, you need to be prepared for flood season.

The following video has been translated into the top ranked languages spoken in King County. It includes tips on how to make an emergency plan and kit; how to stay informed; and how to stay safe by not walking or driving through standing water and preventing carbon monoxide poisoning.

YouTube

Windows Media

NOTE: External links. NOTE: All videos are in Windows Media format. To view, get Windows Media Player.

English (3:15) (View transcript)

English (3:15) (View transcript)

American Sign Language (6:53)

American Sign Language (6:53)

Amharic (7:03)

Amharic (7:03)

Arabic / فارسی 
(6:34)

Arabic / فارسی 
(6:34)

Bosnian / Bosanski (4:08) Bosnian / Bosanski (4:08)

Cantonese (6:35)

Cantonese (6:35)

Farsi / فارسی 
(4:32)

Farsi / فارسی 
(4:32)

French / Français (6:22)

French / Français (6:22)

Hmong / Hmoob (5:58)

Hmong / Hmoob (5:58)

Khmer (Cambodian) (5:15)

Khmer (Cambodian) (5:15)

Laotian (5:00) Laotian (5:00)

Mandarin (5:17)

Mandarin (5:17)

Portuguese / Português (4:42) Portuguese / Português (4:42)

Punjabi / ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (5:21)

Punjabi / ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (5:21)

Russian / Русский (5:27)

Russian / Русский (5:27)

Somali / af Soomaali (5:32)

Somali / af Soomaali (5:32)

Spanish / Español (3:58)

Spanish / Español (3:58)

Tagalog (Filipino) (6:02)

Tagalog (Filipino) (6:02)

Tigrigna (6:03)

Tigrigna (6:03)

Ukrainian / Українська (4:53)

Ukrainian / Українська (4:53)

Vietnamese / Tiếng Việt (4:16)

Vietnamese / Tiếng Việt (4:16)

Thank you

A special thank you to all the volunteer interpreters who made this project possible.

This project was sponsored by the King County Flood Control Distrct (external link) in partnership with the American Red Cross (external link) and the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks. For more information about this project, contact Saffa Bardaro.

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Video Transcript

Hi. My name is Julia Patterson. I’m Chair of the King County Flood Control District.

Did you know that many parts of King County, Washington flood every year? Most floods happen from November through February during heavy rainfall or when the snow in the mountains melts quickly and the rivers rise. Sometimes flooding can be mild. But other times floods can be dangerous. So, it is important to be prepared and safe. Here’s how.

First, make an emergency plan. If you live, work or go to school in a floodplain, find out where the evacuation routes are to and from those locations. Pick a place you and your family will meet, and a place where you might stay, if you are unable to get back to your home. Choose a friend or family member living outside the area that you and your family can call for information if there is a local emergency. Keep important documents and items dry and safe by storing them in water proof containers and high above flood levels.

Stay informed. Monitor local radio and television stations for emergency information. Find out if there is an emergency network set up in your community to share information by phone or the Internet; such as, text messaging, Twitter or Facebook.

Do not drive or walk through standing or moving floodwaters. This is the leading cause of flood-related death. In a flood you may be unable to see hazards beneath the water; such as, washed out roads or electrical power lines that have fallen. So, if a road is closed, be safe – stay out. After a flood, keep out of floodwaters – especially children and pets – since the water may be contaminated.

Prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is a gas that is produced whenever any fuel such as gas, oil, kerosene, wood, or charcoal is burned. It cannot be seen or smelled and can kill people or animals in minutes. So never burn charcoal or use gasoline or kerosene powered equipment indoors. And do not use a gas oven to heat your home.

Keep basic emergency supplies where you live or in your car; such as:

  • a radio and batteries;
  • a whistle;
  • a flashlight and batteries;
  • some warm clothing, shoes and blankets;
  • food and water;
  • and first aid supplies; such as sterile bandages and wipes, scissors, tweezers, a thermometer and basic medicines.

For help with disaster preparedness and response, please call the American Red Cross, serving King & Kitsap Counties, at 206-323-2345.

To find out if you live in a King County floodplain or for King County flooding information, call 206-296-8001. Interpreter services are available.

For information about the flood safety videos, please contact Saffa Bardaro, Communications Specialist, River and Floodplain Management Section.